Northern Wyoming Daily News - Serving the Big Horn Basin for over 100 years

By Marcus Huff
Staff Writer 

Security for courthouse offices considered

WORLAND – Washakie County Commissioners heard a security request from the Office of the County Assessor on Tuesday, along with reviewing regular department business during their first December meeting at the county courthouse.

 

December 6, 2017



WORLAND – Washakie County Commissioners heard a security request from the Office of the County Assessor on Tuesday, along with reviewing regular department business during their first December meeting at the county courthouse.

As reported by County Assessor Kathy Treanor, the Assessor’s Office has had several instances of being approached by “aggressive” taxpayers and customers, to the point that the office staff have reported feeling threatened.

After consulting with Sheriff Steve Rakness, Treanor was advised to request upgraded security for the office. Currently, the office has an open floor plan, and anyone can approach the desks of the employees.

While Treanor and staff believe a glass wall or partition would hinder the feeling of customer service, they would like to see a barrier to keep customers from directly approaching their work area.

After consultation with the commission and Tom Schmeltzer with county maintenance, it was decided that a counter and security gate would probably suffice, but that the department should devise a design and submit it to the commission at the next scheduled meeting for approval.

County Attorney John Worrall noted that the State Supreme Court conducted a security assessment of the courthouse, and the recommendations were available for review.

In other business, LeAnn Baker with the Washakie Development Association requested to move the WDA offices to their previous location at the Cloverfield Building at the Lighthouse complex. The WDA is currently occupying offices at the Washakie Development building on Rodeo Drive in the Fairview Industrial Park, but future plans could include selling the building.

Schmeltzer replied that the Cloverfield offices would need new paint and carpet, and the commission discussed moving some electrical outlets to accommodate office machinery.

Schmeltzer also reported that the Lighthouse facility will be totally completed next week.

The five-bed Lighthouse center run by Cloud Peak Counseling housed almost 70 patients in 2016, from Big Horn, Hot Springs, Park, Fremont and Washakie counties. The latest expansion brings the facility to a seven-room center, with a social detox area, at a projected cost of $97,000.

Stuart Bower with the Road and Bridge Department reported the county’s preparedness for snow removal, the cost effectiveness of trading older equipment, and two culverts that need to be replaced under a bridge leading to the county law enforcement shooting range, located behind the Boys School.

County Clerk Mary Grace Strauch reported that two advertised pieces of county equipment for sale, a 1985 dump truck and a 1958 water trailer, had received bids of $2,662.01 and $1,500 respectively.

The county voted to accept the bids.

 
 

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