Northern Wyoming News - Serving the Big Horn Basin for over 100 years

BLM to conduct spring prescribed fire projects

 

March 21, 2019



WORLAND, Wyo. – The Bureau of Land Management Wind River/Bighorn Basin District tentatively plans to conduct four prescribed fire projects within the Lander and Worland field office areas this spring as part of the BLM’s commitment to keeping public landscapes healthy and productive. These projects are contingent upon fuel moisture and weather meeting optimal treatment conditions.

“The prescribed fire projects are designed to enhance rangeland and woodland vegetation health, improve wildlife habitat, increase livestock and wildlife forage and improve distribution, and reduce the hazardous build-up of fuels, which lessens the probability of a severe wildfire,” said BLM Fire Management Officer Rich Zimmerlee.

The projects may be conducted in April and May in the following locations:

Hooligan Springs: Approximately 50 acres of juniper, timber litter and mountain shrub in ponderosa pine understory will be targeted. The project area is located in the Renner Wildlife Habitat Management Area 10 miles north of Ten Sleep.

Medicine Lodge: The project will include mosaic sagebrush burning, encroaching conifer reduction and aspen enhancement on 200 acres of BLM-managed and Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) lands. The 3,000-acre project area lies approximately 5 miles northeast of Hyattville in the Medicine Lodge Wildlife Habitat Management Area.

Noon Point: The project will include mosaic sagebrush burning, encroaching conifer reduction and aspen enhancement on 200-400 acres of BLM-managed, State of Wyoming and private lands. The 1,400-acre project area lies approximately 20 miles southwest of Meeteetse. Treatments will continue for the next two years or until completion.

Philp: The project will include mosaic mountain shrub burning to reduce overall shrub density on up to 800 acres of BLM-managed, State of Wyoming and private lands. The 6,300-acre project area is approximately 15 miles northwest of Lysite in the Bridger Creek drainage on the east end of Copper Mountain.

Removing overstory shrubs and trees through the use of prescribed fire opens up areas for grasses and forbs and provides for new growth with more palatable and nutritious forage. Removing understory vegetation through prescribed fire reduces encroaching, competing species and clears the area of heavy fuels, which improves the overall health of the area.

For more information, contact Sage Decker at (307) 347-5100 or Tim Kramer at (307) 332-8431. For more information on prescribed fire and vegetation management on public lands, visit http://www.forestsandrangelands.gov/.

 
 

Powered by ROAR Online Publication Software from Lions Light Corporation
© Copyright 2019