Northern Wyoming Daily News - Serving the Big Horn Basin for over 100 years

By Tracie Mitchell
Staff Writer 

Update on brucellosis status in Wyoming

WORLAND – Ranchers, farmers, veterinarians and curious community members gathered Thursday to learn what brucellosis abortus is, how it is transmitted, the types of animals, both wild and domesticated, who are affected by it, the danger to humans and what is being done to keep it under control and to hopefully eradicate it.

 

February 17, 2018

Tracie Mitchell

WESTI Ag Days attendees received an update on brucellosis in Wyoming including efforts to monitor elk.

WORLAND – Ranchers, farmers, veterinarians and curious community members gathered Thursday to learn what brucellosis abortus is, how it is transmitted, the types of animals, both wild and domesticated, who are affected by it, the danger to humans and what is being done to keep it under control and to hopefully eradicate it.

University of Wyoming veterinarian and brucellosis expert Bruce Hoar explained during a WESTI (Wyoming Extension's Strategically and Technologically Informative) Ag Days, presentation at the Worland Community Center Complex that brucellosis was first discovered in 1887...



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